Public DNS servers 1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1

I’ve been using the public Google DNS servers 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 for several years now. It was once said that using these DNS servers would result in a noticeable speed increase when compared with the DNS servers that your internet provider makes you use. I started using the Google servers and the addresses immediately got stuck in my head, so I haven’t stopped using them since. Until today that is…
I’ve always really liked the easy-to-remember, and simply awesome addresses 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4. I was happy with the response times and I never had any issues or complaints either. So why change? I’d better have a damn good reason for making this choice! Well, obviously I do.

Yesterday somebody told me that he switched to 1.1.1.1 as primary DNS server and 1.0.0.1 as secondary. He also mentioned that the response times are fast af! That info immediately drew my attention. So I decided to further investigate this as soon as I would get home. Turns out that these servers are indeed fast and have good testing results. I also learned that the good people at CloudFlare are behind it (Wiki). I’m pretty sure that remembering these new server addresses will not be a problem either.

I’m looking for speed when it comes to DNS servers. I want to use the fastest DNS servers in existence. The more speed, the better. Naturally I also want them to be reliable, safe, and respecting my privacy. It turns out that 1.1.1.1 & 1.0.0.1 are all these things and more. So I will be saying my goodbye’s to 8.8.8.8 & 8.8.4.4. And at the same time I will be welcoming 1.1.1.1 & 1.0.0.1 with open arms. Would you like to learn more? Or do you need a step-by-step guide on how to change what DNS servers you use? Just visit the website.

Adding cloud storage as permanent mount to Ubuntu Server 16.04

Many cloud storage services give you the option to mount your online storage as an extra drive on your operating system. This can be done really easy on any operating system that runs a desktop environment. But I wanted to add my storage as a mounted drive on Ubuntu Server, and it does not use a desktop environment so I use WinSCP and Putty to administrate my server.
I did some research on how to mount my cloud storage I use at Stackstorage. In my account info on their website they showed me that the address I have to use for WebDAV should be . This was all the information I needed to get started. Here’s a step by step guide how I did this that you can follow but keep in mind that some commands should be different depending on what cloud storage provider you are using. Click on READ MORE to read the full article and watch the video.

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Add Ubuntu Terminal to Windows 10

Have a look at this page for instructions on how to add a terminal to your Windows 10 in a matter of seconds. I just installed it and I’m very pleased with it so far. Could this mean I will stop using Putty after all these years? I’m not sure yet but I’m going to find out really soon. Here’s a link directly to the Windows Store if you don’t need any further instructions.

 

Things you should do after installing Raspbian on your Raspberry Pi

Here are a couple of things that you should do after you’ve installed Raspbian on your Raspberry Pi. Installing the Raspbian operating system itself is very easy so I’m not going into that. You can figure that out on your own. This article is just about a couple of things that you should, or could, do after installing the operating system. Click on the “read more” link below to get started!

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Disable IPv6 on Ubuntu 16.04 Permanently

If you want IPv6 disabled permanently on a Ubuntu 16.04 system, here’s a good way to do it. Disabling it like this should keep it disabled permanently, even after performing updates that could potentially enable it again without you knowing it. I haven’t tested it so I’m not 100% certain but if you decide to upgrade Ubuntu to 16.10 or the most recent version, it should still have ipv6 disabled after upgrading. Now let’s get to it! Simply enter the following commands in your console:

sudo echo "net.ipv6.conf.all.disable_ipv6 = 1
net.ipv6.conf.default.disable_ipv6 = 1
net.ipv6.conf.lo.disable_ipv6 = 1" | sudo tee /etc/sysctl.d/99-my-disable-ipv6.conf
sudo service procps reload
ifconfig

The ifconfig should not show any ipv6 address. A reboot is not required, but it won’t hurt either.

How to install MP4Box on Ubuntu 16.04 Headless

MP4Box is a multimedia packager, with a vast number of functionalities: conversion, splitting, hinting, dumping and others. It can be used for performing many manipulations on multimedia files like AVI, MPG, TS, but mostly on ISO media files (e.g. MP4, 3GP). It is a command-line tool so it can be utilized by scripts like the php script that I want to use. MP4Box is included in the GPAC package.”

I want to be able to use a certain media hosting package but during installation it tells me that it will require MP4Box to continue. I tried installing it regularly (apt-get install mp4box) but that didn’t work. After doing a bit of research I decided to build MP4Box from scratch so that means compiling the source and here’s how I did that.

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World of Warcraft addons that I like and recommend for Legion

I love the fact that the game World of Warcraft allows and provides the option to use addons. I especially love the ones that let me customize the User Interface to my own liking. I run a reasonable amount of addons and I will list the most important ones in a list below. Some players believe that an experienced wow player (I like to think of myself as one of those) doesn’t need addons to play. And there’s some truth in that of course. But it’s not that I nééd them, I just prefer them because they bring some extra things in to the game that I like. So if you are one of those people, screw you and have fun looking at that same UI for more time to come. So here’s the list of my most important addons.

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